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Appearing in "The Challenge!"

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Synopsis for "The Challenge!"

The Apache Kid and his horse Nightwind help Captain Bill Gregory and the US Army in capturing a gang of outlaws. In the aftermath of the battle Gregory thanks Apache Kid for his help, but the Kid attributes their victory to the assistance of Nightwind. Riding behind the rest of the army, Bill asks Apache Kid to tell him the story about how he found Nightwind.

Apache Kid recounts his origins, how he was a white boy whose family was attacked by Apaches. Instead of being killed by the Native Americans, their leader Red Hawk decided to take in the boy and raise him as an Apache and use to drive the white settlers from their land. However the adult Apache Kid determined that Native Americans and the settlers must live in peace and developed his alter-ego of Aloysius Kare so that he could act as a hero to both peoples and maintain the peace.

He then goes on to explain the origins of how he found Nightwind and made the black stallion his steed:

One day four years prior, the Apache Kid was changing into his alter-ego of Aloysius Kare when he heard something in the bushes. Fearing that someone might have discovered his double identity, Kare drew his gun only to be bowled over by the black stallion that would soon become his faithful horse. The two gazed at each other in mutual respect until a pack of wild horses passing by prompted the stallion to leave.

As Aloysius watched the horses gallop away he was ambushed by a gang of outlaws let by Buck Kraig who demanded to know when a gold shipment was leaving out of town. When Kare refused to tell them, Buck's men then stripped Kare of his shirt and tied him to a tree and left him under guard while he roasted in the sun. Thinking himself doomed, Aloysius was surprised when the black stallion returned and chewed through his bonds unseen by his captors. Kare then pretended to want to talk and when the outlaws got close enough he attacked them. Taking some guns, Aloysius Kare gunned down Buck and his gang. The black horse then rode off, and Kare had a feeling that he would someday see the horse again.

Weeks later, as the Apache Kid, Kare assisted Red Hawk and the Apaches in chasing some outlaws. At risk of losing them across the state line, they were surprised when a herd of horses led by the black stallion blocked their path leading to the outlaws capture. Later that night he spotted the horse watching over the Apache village. Later still while out grazing his horse as Aloysius Kare, the Kid was attacked by a band of renegade Native Americans. His flight was stopped when they killed his horse, forcing Kare to defend himself. Aloysius was given a hand when the horse and his herd came to his rescue, forcing the renegades away. Seeing that Kare's horse was dead, the stallion then came to Kare and allowed him to be his pet. Aloysius then named the horse Nightwind.

Finishing his story, Apache Kid bids Captain Gregory farewell.

Appearing in "The Half-Breed's Treachery"

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Synopsis for "The Half-Breed's Treachery"

Bacardo Al, an outlaw of mixed race is chased out of town by the sheriff and his posse but manages to escape into the plains. Among the posse is Aloysius Kare, and when the others continue their hunt, Kare slips away to hunt for Bacardo Al on his own.

Meanwhile, Al has come across some Native American nomads travelling across the plains. He kills the last man in line and uses the dead man's shawl to disguise himself and hopes his disguise will allow him to slip away. Shortly thereafter, Kare comes across the dead Native American and changes into the Apache Kid. Seeing the nomads footprints he realizes that Al is posing as one of them when he sees his boot marks in the dirt following the procession.

Seeking to catch Al in a trap, Apache Kid approaches the nomads and asks to join them. They allow him to join their pilgrimage so long as he does so in peace. As a token to this end, the Apache Kid agrees to leave all his weapons behind as he follows the band of nomads in their travels. Al becomes determined to try and find a way of eliminating the Apache Kid without blowing his cover, while the Apache Kid must quietly determine which of the men is Bacardo Al and not act until Al tries to take his life. Singling Al out in the group, the Apache Kid purposely puts himself between Al and the rest of the procession.

When Al tries to stab the Apache Kid in the back, and the Kid stops him. The leader of the nomads then orders both of their deaths for disrupting their peace. The Apache Kid tries to speak reason, but Al drops his cover and pulls out his gun and threatens to kill them all. However, the Apache Kid had kept a single arrow hidden in his pants and uses it to disarm Bacardo Al of his weapon. Taking the outlaw into his possession the nomad thanks the Apache Kid for trying to use peace before conflict and allows the hero to go his own way.

Appearing in "The Man Who Would Not Die!"

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Synopsis for "The Man Who Would Not Die!"

Western tale.

Appearing in "The Cougar Strikes!"

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Synopsis for "The Cougar Strikes!"

The village of Apaches led by Red Hawk have had their livestock attacked and killed by what appears to be a cougar that has been stalking their lands and so the Apache Kid is sent out with a hunting party to track down and destroy the beast. However as night begins to fall they stop their hunt for the night and begin to return to their village.

As they arrive home they hear the screams some of the women including White Swan. Questioning a woman named High Cloud they learn that her mate has been killed and that White Swan has gone missing. Searching the area, the Apache Kid and Red Hawk find cougar tracks near White Swan's teepee. The Apache Kid decides to go out and hunt the cougar alone and rescue White Swan if he can. As the Apache Kid follows the backtrail he confirms his suspicions: Whatever this cougar is, it stalks on two legs instead of four.

In a nearby cave, the cougar who has kidnapped White Swan is a Native American man named Black Cougar who has fashioned weapons out of the paws of a cougar. He explains to White Swan that he was exiled from their tribe years ago for trying to oust Red Hawk as leader of the Apaches and that he has now come to get revenge by killing Red Hawk's son the Apache Kid.

However it is not the Apache Kid who arrives at the cave, but his alter-ego Aloysius Kare. Unaware that Kare is really the Apache Kid, the Cougar demands that he drop his guns and become his prisoner, promising to let White Swan go in exchange. White Swan tells Kare to go warn Apache Kid and Red Hawk of the Cougar but Kare doesn't listen. Tossing down his guns, Aloysius turns himself over to the Couger who is true to his word and lets White Swan go.

As it turns out, Black Cougar recognizes Aloysius Kare as the Apache Kid, remembering the time when Red Hawk took him in as a boy. Kare then surprises the Cougar by causing the cave to collapse, killing his foe with a ton of rocks. Leaving the cave, Aloysius tells White Swan to return to the Apache camp and tell the Kid and Red Hawk not to worry about the Cougar, as he will menace the tribe no more.

Notes

  • The story "The Challenge" contradicts the story of how Apache Kid won his horse Nightwind that was depicted in the story "The Curse of Night-Wind" featured in Apache Kid #53. As established in Blaze of Glory #1 all of Timely and Atlas era western tales have been said to be dime store novels based on true stories of the heroes of the west. These conflicting stories could be considered two alternate takes on the actual story of how Apache Kid won his horse Nightwind.
  • The Apache Kid origin told in "The Challenge" can also be considered a fictionalized version. As established in Apache Skies #1, the Apache Kid was not a white man raised by Apaches but the son of mixed race his father was Caucasian and his mother a Native American.

See Also

Footnotes

  1. First and only known appearance to date besides flashbacks



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