Appearing in "The Hunchback of Hollywood and the Movie Murder"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Captain America Comics #3.

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Synopsis for "The Hunchback of Hollywood and the Movie Murder"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Captain America Comics #3.

American film maker Mark Carstine decides to make his next picture a medieval tale that is in reality an anti-Nazi picture using the backdrop as a metaphor for a democracy battling a dictatorship. Overheard by a Nazi sympathizer, the man disguises himself as the Hunchback and murders Carstine. Despite Carstine's murder, the film goes on and begins production near Camp Lehigh, recruiting the local soldiers as extras in the film -- including Steve Rogers and James Barnes.

Steve plays the role of a knight in a jousting scene which is abruptly ended when the other actor is killed by an arrow. Changing into Captain America and Bucky the two heroes catch up with the murderous archer but he is killed by another before he can reveal anything. Chasing after the killers accomplice they are attacked by the Hunchback before the set crumbles. Pulling themselves from the rubble they run into famous actor Craig Talbot who tells them that the Hunchback escaped in the direction of Goris Barloff's dressing room. Because Barloff, a popular horror movie actor, was made popular for playing the role of a hunch back he becomes the lead suspect even though he angrily denies anything to do with the murders on set. When the authorities attempt to arrest Barloff, his direct helps facilitate his escape.

Investigating things further as Captain America and Bucky, the two heroes catch the Hunchback attempting to strangle actress Marie Deterle. Saving her life, they chase the Hunchback to the prop castle that has been constructed on the set. Searching for him there, Captain America runs into Talbot who he correctly deduces is really the killer. Captain America easily defeats Talbot in a duel and turns him over to the authorities. To everyone's surprise they learn that Talbot was a member of a pro Nazi bund and was seeking to stop production on the film.

Appearing in "I Am the Prisoner of the Voodoo King!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Journey into Mystery #82.

Featured Characters:

  • Criminal Fugitive (Unnamed)

Supporting Characters:

  • Cop (Unnamed)

Antagonists:

  • Voodoo Tribe (Unnamed)

Other Characters:

  • Native Villager (Unnamed)

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  • Voodoo King

Synopsis for "I Am the Prisoner of the Voodoo King!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Journey into Mystery #82.

A prisoner, being escorted from a jungle colony by a police officer, seizes his chance to escape into the jungle. Coming across a voodoo tribe, he sees the statue they are worshiping is made of solid gold. He manages to steal it (called the Voodoo King by the tribesmen) and runs into the jungle. He comes across a peaceful village where he is told the statue he carries is cursed. Angered, he tries to put the statue down so he can quiet the man with his fists, but finds he cannot. The Voodoo King has become attached to him. It is worth millions but he can't sell it until the curse has been removed, but if he goes back to the voodoo tribe, they will kill him. What will happen to him? What? What???

Appearing in "Beware the Uboongi"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Strange Tales #100.

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Synopsis for "Beware the Uboongi"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Strange Tales #100.

The planet Uranus. Sometime in the future. Americans land on the planet, but can't claim it because they are chased off by ferocious creatures. Back on Earth, they report that Uranus has two species: one is peaceful, the other, the Uboongi, is deadly. Communists hear that the Americans weren't able to claim the planet, so they make preparations to claim it, heedless of the Americans' warnings. The twist is that the Russians didn't know that the ferocious-looking beasts were harmless, but it was the tame-looking ones that were the menace.

Appearing in "Bruttu"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Tales of Suspense #22.

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  • Police
  • Army

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  • The Atomic Machine

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  • Police cars
  • Army tank
  • Subway car

Synopsis for "Bruttu"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Tales of Suspense #22.

Tales of Suspense Vol 1 22 001.jpg

A milksop scientist working on an experimental machine is thinking of a comic book monster when an accidental discharge of energy transforms him into the creature's likeness. He goes on an unintended rampage through town because he can no longer speak and communicate his non-hostile intentions, the military authorities attack and drive him into the woods. While approaching a small house he gets the idea that he can write with an object, but the owner drives him away with a rifle. He loves his research assistant and, coming to the realization that the army will eventually destroy him, resolves to see her one last time. He approaches her home and uses a rake to write in the ground he means no harm, but since the scientist disappeared when the monster appeared, the woman jumps to the conclusion that he "has killed the man I loved." Since he realizes now what a fool he has been for wanting to be big and strong since the woman he loved loved him as the way he was, he returns to the atomic machine and bathes in its rays once more thinking of the man he had been. He changes back and embraces the woman. Stan was such a big softy.

Appearing in "I Saw the End of the World!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Strange Tales #73.

Featured Characters:

  • Professor Egen

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  • Time Machine

Synopsis for "I Saw the End of the World!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Strange Tales #73.

Strange Tales Vol 1 73 008.jpg

A scientist builds a time machine and discovers that time is a loop with all events repeating themselves endlessly for eternity.

Appearing in "The Weird Case of the Plundering Butterfly and the Ancient Mummies!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Captain America Comics #3.

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Synopsis for "The Weird Case of the Plundering Butterfly and the Ancient Mummies!"

This story is a reprint of the comic
Captain America Comics #3.

The local Egyptian museum is plagued by a series of robberies committed by a villain known as the Butterfly, who scoffs at the law and gloats over his successes. The press his daring robberies make attract the attention of Steve Rogers and James Barnes who decide to investigate the case further. Meanwhile, the museum is being delivered a new shipment of ancient Egyptian artifacts being overseen by Dr. Vitrioli who cautions the men moving them to be careful. Two of the following nights the Butterfly returns, each time killing the guard on duty and stealing a treasure on site.

When James Barnes goes on a field trip to the museum with his class he breaks off from the group to explore on his own and comes across a secret passageway where he finds the Butterfly's costume and the stolen loot. He runs into Lenny, Dr. Vitrioli's strong assistant and is knocked out and taken prisoner. When Bucky doesn't return to Camp Lehigh, Steve decides to investigate but gets no help. He decides to hide out in the museum until after it closes and explore as Captain America. That night Captain America clashes with both Lenny and the Butterfly in the museum. The battle ends when Cap causes the Butterfly to fall cracking open his head. As he dies, he is unmasked as Dr. Vitrioli and he tells Cap that Bucky is locked up in a sarcophagus in his secret room. Captain America hears the police as they enter the room, and dashes out to find Bucky. Bucky is still okay thanks to some air holes in the sarcophagus, and they change into their normal clothes and escape through a secret back door. Bucky laughs at Captain America for explaining to a passerby that he is a very nervous person and is glad the Butterfly was brought to justice.

Notes

  • This issue begins reprinting super-hero stories with Captain America. The series will eventually be comprised of all Golden Age Super-Hero stories and the Horror/Sci-Fi stories will diminish.
  • Modifications were made to the Golden Age Captain America stories perhaps to meet the current Comics Code. Story VI was originally titled The Queer Case of the Butterfly. Also, the Butterfly impaled his victims in the Golden Age. In this story, he appears to punch and pummel his opponents.

See Also

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 First and only known appearance to date besides flashbacks



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