FANDOM


Choose a Letter:
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


In accordance with the naming conventions, it has been suggested that this page be moved to:
Earthspace (Discuss).
Please do not move this page yet, as the correct name could still be in discussion and may change again soon. A robot will make the necessary page moves once any discussions are resolved.

Marvel Logo


Earthspace

The Earthspace refers to the Earth's universe,[1] this being the specific universe within a reality where the planet Earth is located. It's the plane of existence where the planet shares space and time with other celestial bodies, like the Sun, the rest of the Solar System, the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy, and so on.[2]

(See Also: Universe, Earth)
  1. Avengers Academy #19; recap page
  2. Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme #21

[top] [Edit Earthspace]


Electroplasm

An ethereal substance, comprised of living Unstable Molecules,[1] whose source and properties remain largely unknown. The inhabitants of Dimension Ecch are comprised of it.[2]

  1. Slapstick #1
  2. Slapstick Vol 2 #1

[top] [Edit Electroplasm]


Elder of the Universe

A sentient being who has survived the race (and usually the entire galaxy) in which he or she originated. Several such beings were been granted immortality by Death. These beings usually have an occupation, from which they take their name, to occupy themselves. Examples include the Collector, the Trader, and the Runner.

[top] [Edit Elder of the Universe]


Elf

A certain humanoid being native to the Asgardian realm of Alfheim and Svartalfheim, and possibly other extradimensional worlds as well.

[top] [Edit Elf]


Empathic

Having the capability to share the emotions of another through psychic means.

[top] [Edit Empathic]


Energy Blasts

Scott Summers (Earth-616) from Uncanny X-Men Vol 3 5 McGuinness Variant Cover

Energy blasts are various forms of energy that are expelled from the body.

These can be of varying types- Either a beam of force, which has the effect of a blunt object in affecting its target (as in Cyclops' optic blast), a beam of heat, or a magical beam which can have different effects depending on its user's wishes.

  • Cyclops possesses the mutant ability to project a powerful beam of concussive, ruby-colored force from his eyes. Cyclops's powers come from ambient energies (such as solar radiation, photons, and cosmic rays) absorbed and metabolized by his body into concussive blasts that are released from his eyes.
  • The Wasp could generate powerful bio-electric blasts from her hand that have been shown to be capable of cutting through high-density structures and is able to cause extreme pain to superhumanly strong and highly durable beings.

Examples



[top] [Edit Energy Blasts]

Energy Manipulation

Energy Manipulation is the ability to generate, control, and manipulate various forms of energy.

  • Energy Detection: The ability to detect energy signatures from great distances. This includes other mutants with energy powers and ships that use energy as a power supply.
  • Energy Disruption: The ability to manipulate energy even if it does not originate from the user.
  • Energy Self-Sustenance: Some energy manipulators appear capable of breathing in space. Though this ability seems to be limited, as if they don't rest or find power other then their own, power reserves will leave them seemingly depleted until they does.
  • Flight: The ability to fly and levitate using energy. Some are capable of interstellar flight (adding more energy to become increasingly fast, presumably sub-light or light speed).
  • Power Suppression: The ability to override another's mutagenic aura, making them temporarily unable to use them. This is usually limited to only other energy-manipulators.
  • Solid Energy Constructs/Simulated Telekinesis: The ability solidify energy into forcefields and other shapes. The effect of these energy constructs can be used to simulate a form of telekinesis by lifting and moving objects.
  • Variable Energy Blasts: The ability to generate light, heat, force, and electricity or really any form of energy in the form of powerful blasts. These blasts are usually generated from the hands and eyes.

Known Energy Manipulators


[top] [Edit Energy Manipulation]

Enigma Force

Micronauts Vol 1 11 011

The Enigma Force is a mystical energy field that permeates the Microverse, a subatomic universe. As the name implies, no one truly understands it. In a sense, it is the Microverse, and its first priority is survival. It does not (and perhaps cannot) act directly; rather, it works through the Time Travelers to protect and preserve the Microverse.[citation needed]

One million years ago, the Wanderers came to Earth from many worlds. There they faced extinction at the hands of spectral beings called Whirldemons. With a magical blade called the Sword in the Star, Prince Wayfinder created a new universe for the Wanderers and imprisoned the demons. Wayfinder became the first Time Traveler.[citation needed]

One thousand years ago, Commander Arcturus Rann set out on a voyage to explore the Microverse. While his conscious mind spent a thousand years in suspended animation, his subconscious made contact with the Enigma Force. At intervals, astral copies of Rann would appear and become new Time Travelers. Some of them became Shadow Priests, who set up churches devoted to worship of Dallan and Sepsis (Rann's royal parents). All this activity prepared Rann to confront Baron Karza when he returned home. At the proper moment, the Shadow Priests shed their disguises and reunited with Rann, giving him the power to defeat Karza.[1]

The Enigma Force came into play again when the Spacewall between the Microverse and the Macroverse (i.e. the Marvel Universe) began to break down and the Whirldemons escaped. Rann had lost his connection to the Enigma Force, which meant that many of the Time Travelers ceased to exist (or were inaccessible). While Rann tried to restore that connection, the Microns (with the help of Doctor Strange) went on a quest to reclaim the Sword in the Star, drive back the Whirldemons, and repair the Spacewall.[2]

Recently, the King of the Whirldemons escaped his prison on Earth and attempted to reopen the Spacewall. To counter this, the Enigma Force gathered three of its Macroversal former hosts of the Uni-Power (see "The Uni-Power" below): Spider-Man, the Invisible Woman, and X-23. The Enigma Force recognized its special bond with X-23, the latter having chosen its power to escape hell sometime earlier. X-23 eventually defeated the King of the Whirldemons by allowing herself to be possessed so that she could return it to its prison.[3]

Before it left her, the Enigma Force informed Laura that she is the future heir to its power, telling her that she was its chosen vessel and that the preceding events were only the beginning.[3]

The Uni-Power

During the Karza Wars, a Time Traveler first bestowed the Uni-Power on someone in the Macroverse. The Uni-Power is not the Enigma Force itself but only one facet of it. It allows anyone anywhere to become Captain Universe in times of great danger. Like the Enigma Force, the Uni-Power is sentient to the extent that it will not willingly allow itself to be used for evil.[citation needed]

Recently, the Uni-Power itself began to fluctuate. It merged with several superbeings to find the source of its problem.[citation needed]

Time Travelers

Micronauts Vol 1 2 018

Time Travelers Micronauts #2

Time Travelers typically appear as glowing green ethereal figures that strongly resemble Commander Rann. They are almost as mysterious as the force they serve. They observe, but they do not interfere. They hold great power, but they give it to others to use. The Shadow Priests claimed that they were only shadows next to the light of the Enigma Force.[citation needed]

Obviously, the Time Travelers can move forward and backward in time. They see possible futures, and when they detect a threat to the Microverse, they take steps to counter that threat. In their Temple of Time, they sift through clues and formulate strategies. They are not omniscient; often, their plans do not bear fruit until the last minute, when the fate of the universe may hang in the balance.[citation needed]

They are limited by the abilities of their agents. In Rann's case, when he lost the ability to tap into his subconscious, the Time Travelers had no way to communicate with him, much less manifest their power in him.[citation needed]

As individual entities, they are vulnerable. Karza was able to capture several and drain energy from them.[4] They are also able to act independently of the Enigma Force and travel to other universes.[citation needed]

  1. Micronauts #11
  2. Micronauts #35
  3. 3.0 3.1 X-23 Vol 3 #16
  4. Micronauts #26

[top] [Edit Enigma Force]


Entropy

The universal tendency for energy in a closed system to equalize. On a universe-wide scale, it is the inevitable degradation of matter and energy to an inert uniform state incapable of sustaining life.

(See Also: Wikipedia article)
[top] [Edit Entropy]


ESP

(Extra-Sensory Perception) The psychic powers of telepathy, precognition, clairvoyance. A person who possesses ESP is called an esper. The spy organization SHIELD has employed an Esper Division.

[top] [Edit ESP]


Essex Gene

The Essex Gene was discovered by Dr. Nathaniel Essex, it would later be known as the X-Gene. This gene is active in mutants and confers a potential for superhuman powers and abilities. Mutates also seem to have their Essex Gene triggered upon exposure.[1]

(See Also: X-Gene)
  1. Further Adventures of Cyclops and Phoenix #1

[top] [Edit Essex Gene]


Eternal

A member of an evolutionary offshoot of humanity (and other races) created through experiments by the alien Celestials. Eternals have extraordinarily long life spans, are virtually indestructible, and possess superhuman physical and energy-manipulative powers.

[top] [Edit Eternal]


Event

Cataclysm 005

Poster promoting the Cataclysm event, detailing the main mini-series and its tie-ins

An event (also known as a "crossover event" or "mega-event") refers to a story with a much bigger reach than a regular story arc or crossover since its main narrative (which usually starts and ends in a core mini-series) bleeds into other comics.

Comic issues with stories adjacent to the main narrative are called tie-ins. While the stories of the tie-ins revolve around the event's main narrative, they're only complementary and it's not necessary to read them to grasp the main story. There are different types of tie-ins. They can constitute of a mini-series or one-shot created exclusively for the event, or one or more issues of an ongoing series. The cover of a tie-in will be marked to distinguish it as such. In most cases, the layout of the cover will either match up the distinct design used by the covers of the main mini-series, or make use of elements reminiscent of it.

The word "event" itself describes the type of stories associated with them. Due to their nature, events require many characters to be affected by the main narrative in some way or another. Since events are massive in scope from a publication perspective, the case is the same from a perspective within the story. Events feature developments of great importance meant to cause repercussions, like world-endangering threats or big shifts in the status quo of the landscape of the superhuman community. It's not uncommon for events to also feature the death of characters in order to spark interest and reinforce the stakes of the story.

An example of an event is Civil War, a story which pits Iron Man and Captain America in an ideological battle over the Superhuman Registration Act. The main conflict of the book was told in a 7-issue mini-series called Civil War. Ongoing series like Iron Man and Captain America had tie-in issues that fleshed out each character's personal narrative, while other series like Amazing Spier-Man and Fantastic Four used tie-ins to highlight their protagonists' role in the conflict since they were secondary characters in the main book. Wolverine tied into the event, but since Wolverine himself was not present in the main conflict, his series told an adjacent story that stemmed from it. While Uncanny X-Men didn't tie into Civil War, a mini-series named Civil War: X-Men created for the event did. Another of Civil War's companion mini-series was Civil War: Front Line.

Some of Marvel's most noteworthy events include:


(See Also: Category:Events)
[top] [Edit Event]


Exoskeleton

(1.) A rigid framework inside which an organism's other components are contained. Examples include mollusks and insects, who are invertebrates (literally, spineless). Mammals and reptiles are vertebrates with interior skeletons.

(2.) A mechanical device that amplifies the strength of the user, who stands or sits in an open cabin. Such devices typically have two arms and/or two legs so that their operation is more intuitive.

Ex Nihilo stated that (surprisingly), only three percent of sentient races had exoskeletons[1] (although it is unknown if he mentioned artificial or natural -or both- exoskeletons).

  1. Avengers Vol 5 #1

[top] [Edit Exoskeleton]


Extinction Gene

Extinction Gene from New X-Men Vol 1 116 0001

Discovery

The Extinction Gene, E-Gene,[citation needed] or Extinction Sequence[1][2] is a hominid gene discovered by Doctor Hank McCoy in September 2001. According to him, it could turn on among the humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) and cause the extinction of the human race, in four generations; This race would be completely replaced by the mutants (Homo sapiens superior) because the number of this latter reached, at the beginning of the 21st century, a very important threshold.[3]

E for Extinction

Cassandra Nova thought that this gene was responsible for the disappearance of Neanderthals (Homo sapiens neanderthalis), thirty thousand years earlier, when they were replaced by the humans. Not wanting to see the disappearance of the whole of Humanity, she decided to commit the Genosha Genocide to decrease the number of mutants on Earth (of more than sixteen million people).[4]

Planet X

The argument of the Extinction Gene was later used by Xorn, impersonating Magneto, during his take-over of Manhattan.[2] In order to appease the relations between the humans and mutants, Henry McCoy presented himself to the U.S. President as the only one able to repair that gene and prevent humanity's extinction.[5]

Alternate realities

Here Comes Tomorrow (Earth-15104)

...

Dead-End Syndrome (House of M; Earth-58163)

In Earth-58163, the "Dead-End Syndrome" was a human distress condition who became prominent following the rise of mutantkind.[6]

Fan-speculation or unreferenced material

The Genosha genocide isn't seen to have been sufficient to prevent the release of the E-Gene.[citation needed] On the contrary, this release seemed to be prevented only by the transformation of millions of mutants into humans by the Scarlet Witch in December of 2005.[citation needed][7] Until the number of mutants rises again it is unclear if the E-Gene will reappear in the human genome.[citation needed]

References

  1. New X-Men #129
  2. 2.0 2.1 New X-Men #147
  3. New X-Men #116
  4. New X-Men #114
  5. New X-Men #150
  6. Secrets of the House of M #1; Stephen Strange's entry
  7. House of M #8

See Also


[top] [Edit Extinction Gene]

Extradimensional

(1.) A being from a dimension other than that of the Earth. (2.) Of or having to do with a dimension other than that of the Earth.

[top] [Edit Extradimensional]


Extraterrestrial

(1.) A being from a world in this dimension other than Earth. (2.) Of or having to do with a world in this dimension other than Earth.

[top] [Edit Extraterrestrial]


Choose a Letter:
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.

Fandom may earn an affiliate commission on sales made from links on this page.

Stream the best stories.

Fandom may earn an affiliate commission on sales made from links on this page.

Get Disney+